Environment

Eaglets Provide Rare Sight At Swan Island Wildlife Management Area

Eaglets Provide Rare Sight At Swan Island Wildlife Management Area

RICHMOND, Maine – A pair of nesting bald eagles at the Swan Island Wildlife Management Area have produced the first documented occurrence of four eaglets in a single nest in the history of the State of Maine, according to wildlife biologists from the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.

“This pair has produced a new milestone for eagle recovery in Maine,” said MDIF&W wildlife biologist Kendall Marden, who manages Swan Island. “After two years of unsuccessful nesting attempts, this year the pair successfully hatched four eaglets. It’s a remarkable event.”

There are believed to have been only three other documented cases of four eaglets in a single nest in the United States.

As recently as 40 years ago, bald eagles were battling against extinction. Widespread use of the pesticide DDT was implicated in detrimental impacts to wildlife, especially birds of prey.

Clean Water for Clams

Clean Water for Clams

By Becky Kolak

If someone were to tell me a year ago that I would be dressed as a life sized clam to educate the public about the significance of clean water to the soft shelled clam, I would have called them crazy! However, as an AmeriCorps Environmental Educator, with the Kennebec Estuary Land Trust and the Maine Conservation Corps (MCC), I am doing just that- donning a homemade clam get-up to promote ‘Clean water for clams.’

Since my term began I have met with municipal shellfish committees, facilitated an after school program at the Patton Free Library, collaborated with the ArtVan Program in Bath, preformed as the Clam Ham in a variety show, worked with state agencies to sample water around clams flats, and visited classrooms as a guest speaker. I am willing to deliver the message of ‘Clean water for clams’ anywhere!

As Maine’s third largest fishery, soft shelled clam harvesting is directly tied to the quality of water in which the clams grow and feed.

First Annual Atlantic salmon Framework Meeting

The National Marine Fisheries Service, U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Maine Department of Marine Resources and the Penobscot Indian Nation have been working together over the past few years to coordinate and prioritize efforts on behalf of wild Atlantic salmon. We share a strong interest in ensuring that our individual and combined resources are used in the most efficient and effective manner to maximize our collective ability to successfully protect and recover endangered Atlantic salmon. The result of those collaborations is an Atlantic Salmon Recovery Framework.

We are very interested in seeking public comments on our activities as well as the opportunity to hear about complementary activities being undertaken by others on behalf of salmon.

Snowshoeing at Inland Woods/Pine Ridge Trails

Stay active this winter!  Join us for a weekly outing on the trails to enjoy quality time with friends in the outdoors.  All are welcome, lights required.  Meet at the trailhead behind Inland Hospital, 200 Kennedy Memorial Drive in Waterville.  Every Wednesday evening throughout February at 5:30pm.  For more information, ewells@emh.org or call 207-861-3292.

Biomass Plant Under Construction at Colby

Biomass Plant Under Construction at Colby

Colby College has begun construction a new biomass plant that will replace about 1 million gallons of heating fuel with about 22 thousand tons of locally sourced wood chips and forest waste annually. The initiative takes the College much closer to its goal of carbon neutrality by 2015.
Estimates of oil and biomass prices suggest the $11.25-million facility will pay for itself in six to 10 years. It is scheduled for completion in the fall of 2011. The plant will burn low-grade forest waste and debris including bark and treetops. The College plans to get its biomass from sustainable forest operations within a 50-mile radius of the Waterville campus.

The twin 400-horsepower biomass-fueled boilers will produce steam used for heat, hot water, cooking, and cogeneration of electricity. They will replace 90 percent of the 1.1 million gallons of heating oil used by Colby each year.

This is one of many initiatives to address Colby's carbon emissions.

Biomass Plant Under Construction at Colby

Biomass Plant Under Construction at Colby

Colby College has begun construction a new biomass plant that will replace about 1 million gallons of heating fuel with about 22 thousand tons of locally sourced wood chips and forest waste annually. The initiative takes the College much closer to its goal of carbon neutrality by 2015.
Estimates of oil and biomass prices suggest the $11.25-million facility will pay for itself in six to 10 years. It is scheduled for completion in the fall of 2011. The plant will burn low-grade forest waste and debris including bark and treetops. The College plans to get its biomass from sustainable forest operations within a 50-mile radius of the Waterville campus.

The twin 400-horsepower biomass-fueled boilers will produce steam used for heat, hot water, cooking, and cogeneration of electricity. They will replace 90 percent of the 1.1 million gallons of heating oil used by Colby each year.

This is one of many initiatives to address Colby's carbon emissions.

Biomass Plant Under Construction at Colby

Biomass Plant Under Construction at Colby

Colby College has begun construction a new biomass plant that will replace about 1 million gallons of heating fuel with about 22 thousand tons of locally sourced wood chips and forest waste annually. The initiative takes the College much closer to its goal of carbon neutrality by 2015.
Estimates of oil and biomass prices suggest the $11.25-million facility will pay for itself in six to 10 years. It is scheduled for completion in the fall of 2011. The plant will burn low-grade forest waste and debris including bark and treetops. The College plans to get its biomass from sustainable forest operations within a 50-mile radius of the Waterville campus.

The twin 400-horsepower biomass-fueled boilers will produce steam used for heat, hot water, cooking, and cogeneration of electricity. They will replace 90 percent of the 1.1 million gallons of heating oil used by Colby each year.

This is one of many initiatives to address Colby's carbon emissions.